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Something new is on the horizon

It’s a new dawn. It’s a new capsule. Horizon celebrates where the Earth’s surface meets the sky.

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What inspired the Horizon capsule?

From Santorini to Hawaii, we love a good sunset. The Horizon capsule is inspired by the world’s most beautiful horizons—the illusive line where the Earth’s surface meets the sky. From sunrise to sunset and every beautiful moment in between, the capsule tracks the sun’s path below the horizon in all its ombre glory.

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How do sunsets happen?

A red sky at night isn’t actually down to your local shepherd’s delight, but a phenomenon known as Rayleigh scattering. The same phenomenon is also what makes the sky appear blue during the day.
Sunlight contains all the colors of the rainbow, but not all the colors reach the ground in the same concentration. This comes down to the wavelength of the light and the size of the particle. When the sun is low on the horizon at sunset and sunrise, sunlight has to pass through more air, which scatters the blue and violet light, leaving those glorious yellow, orange and red hues we can’t get enough of.

Did you know? 7 facts about our skies

• Rayleigh scattering is named after the 19th century British physicist Lord Rayleigh.
• The Earth’s sky is violet, we just see it as blue. Short-wavelength blue and violet light is scattered by molecules in the air much more than other colors of the spectrum. We can’t see violet very well though, so the sky appears blue.
Winter solstice is the best time to take a sunset pic. The sun sets on more of an angle, so it draws it out, giving you more time to get that shot.
• If the Earth was airless like the moon, sunsets wouldn’t be a thing, the sun would simply drop behind the horizon.

• By the time we see the sun set, it’s actually gone. What we see is the refraction of the sun. The Earth’s atmosphere bends light, which allows us to see the sun set.
• The honor of witnessing the world’s first sunrise each day goes to the East Cape in New Zealand on the Gisborne District of North Island.
• During the summer months, as the northern hemisphere tilts closer to the sun, some areas above the Arctic Circle including Scandinavia, Canada and Alaska experience 24 hours of sunlight.

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