Bee The Change Fund

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Bees play an integral role in the functioning of our ecosystems and are disappearing at an alarming rate. We launched the Bee The Change Fund in May, powered by Milkywire. This fund supports grassroots NGOs working to preserve and protect species worldwide from extinction – and we’re happy to report that all the projects we chose to support back in May are now fully funded!

Bee The Change Fund

Powered by Milkywire

Bees play an integral role in the functioning of our ecosystems and are disappearing at an alarming rate. We launched the Bee The Change Fund in May, powered by Milkywire. This fund supports grassroots NGOs working to preserve and protect species worldwide from extinction – and we’re happy to report that all the projects we chose to support back in May are now fully funded!

Human survival depends on bees, as 75% of food crops rely directly or indirectly on bee pollination.

In 2020 we released two collections dedicated to this cause:

The PANGAIA x Takashi Murakami collection, featuring a unique bee design and flower prints with a thread that connects the two.

PANGAIA x Selfridges, a limited-edition collection featuring PANGAIA’s Bee The Change message in Selfridges’ iconic yellow.

Human survival depends on bees, as 75% of food crops rely directly or indirectly on bee pollination.

In 2020 we released two collections dedicated to this cause:

The PANGAIA x Takashi Murakami collection, featuring a unique bee design and flower prints with a thread that connects the two.

PANGAIA x Selfridges, a limited-edition collection featuring PANGAIA’s Bee The Change message in Selfridges’ iconic yellow.

Since it began in May, the Bee The Change Fund has raised over $46,000.

This was distributed to the following organizations:

BugLife

B-Lines project (UK). Pollinators, including bees, are confined to tiny fragments of habitat and unable to move across the countryside as our climate and landscape rapidly change. It has been predicted that 40-70% of species could go extinct if action is not taken, which is why it is important to support the creation of B-lines.

Nordens Arc

Tag a Bee project (Sweden). The aim of this project is to tag 5000 bees with RFID chips (radio-frequency identification) to gain more knowledge of how, when and where they fly to collect pollen.Through this research project, we can gain knowledge that helps protect and informs the preservation of both domestic and wild bees.

Mpala Research Centre

People and Pollinators project (Kenya). Due to the use of agricultural pesticides and loss of natural habitats, bee numbers have declined dramatically. At the Mpala Research Centre, Dino Martins is working with farmers in East Africa to raise awareness about the importance of pollinators and encourage the adoption of more sustainable farming practices that conserve the bees, boost crops and improve livelihoods.

Bumblebee Conservation Trust

Short-haired Bumblebee Reintroduction project (UK). The short-haired bumblebee was last recorded in 1988 and declared extinct in the UK in 2000. This species of bee is currently being reintroduced in the UK through this project, established in 2009. The team are working with farmers, conservation groups and other landowners to create flower-rich habitat within the release area.

Milgis Trust

Milgis Ecosystem, Northern Kenya. Digby Douglas-Dufresne is a Sustainability Coordinator and Conservationist running a beekeeping program with more than 40 indigenous beekeepers, teaching them sustainable beekeeping methods and how to produce marketable products. 

This was distributed to the following organizations:

BugLife

B-Lines project (UK). Pollinators, including bees, are confined to tiny fragments of habitat and unable to move across the countryside as our climate and landscape rapidly change. It has been predicted that 40-70% of species could go extinct if action is not taken, which is why it is important to support the creation of B-lines.

Nordens Ark

Tag a Bee project (Sweden). The aim of this project is to tag 5000 bees with RFID chips (radio-frequency identification) to gain more knowledge of how, when and where they fly to collect pollen.Through this research project, we can gain knowledge that helps protect and informs the preservation of both domestic and wild bees.

Mpala Research Centre

People and Pollinators project (Kenya). Due to the use of agricultural pesticides and loss of natural habitats, bee numbers have declined dramatically. At the Mpala Research Centre, Dino Martins is working with farmers in East Africa to raise awareness about the importance of pollinators and encourage the adoption of more sustainable farming practices that conserve the bees, boost crops and improve livelihoods.

Bumblebee Conservation Trust

Short-haired Bumblebee Reintroduction project (UK). The short-haired bumblebee was last recorded in 1988 and declared extinct in the UK in 2000. This species of bee is currently being reintroduced in the UK through this project, established in 2009. The team are working with farmers, conservation groups and other landowners to create flower-rich habitat within the release area.

Milgis Trust

Milgis Ecosystem, Northern Kenya. Digby Douglas-Dufresne is a Sustainability Coordinator and Conservationist running a beekeeping program with more than 40 indigenous beekeepers, teaching them sustainable beekeeping methods and how to produce marketable products.

Watch this space.

This is just the start. We’re working on broadening our ability to protect and restore biodiversity on Earth and look forward to sharing more about our initiatives, including how you can help. Check back for our latest updates.

Last updated: 17.12.20