Recycled Wool & Cashmere

Animal Fibers

Recycled Wool & Cashmere

Animal Fibers

When produced responsibly, animal fibers are inherently renewable and biodegradable and hold remarkable properties.

When produced responsibly, animal fibers are inherently renewable and biodegradable and hold remarkable properties.

We strive to use responsibly sourced natural fibers, from both plants and animals. We do not support harmful and inhumane practices.

Wool

Sheep shearing is an essential practice to maintain the animal’s health and hygiene as sheep are unable to shed their fleece coat alone. This must be done even if the fibers aren’t used for yarns. If the fleece is too long, the animals are at risk of overheating, becoming immobilized and more susceptible to predation.

We work with Responsible Wool Standard (RWS) sheep producers who care about the animals and practice careful shearing management.

We strive to use responsibly sourced natural fibers, from both plants and animals. We do not support harmful and inhumane practices.

Wool

Sheep shearing is an essential practice to maintain the animal’s health and hygiene as sheep are unable to shed their fleece coat alone. This must be done even if the fibers aren’t used for yarns. If the fleece is too long, the animals are at risk of overheating, becoming immobilized and more susceptible to predation.

We work with Responsible Wool Standard (RWS) sheep producers who care about the animals and practice careful shearing management.

Cashmere

Cashmere goats produce a double fleece that consists of a coarse outer coat, called guard hair, and a fine, soft undercoat, commonly referred to as cashmere. The fluffy undercoat keeps the animal warm over the winter and then sheds in spring. As the fine fibers loosen they are able to be removed by hand combing - a process that is neither distressing or disruptive to the animal if done correctly and responsibly.

Unlike sheep, goats destroy the grasses they eat, pulling them up by the roots rather than grazing the tops. For this reason cashmere production has been criticized for having a detrimental impact on the environment.The high demand for cashmere has caused increased herd sizes, and has resulted in the desertification of over 70% of healthy pasture land in Mongolia, which results in increased local temperature and air pollution.

Where

We want to eliminate the clothing industry’s dependence on unsustainable virgin animal fibers and combat global textile waste. 

By using post-consumer materials like discarded garments (existing fabrics), rather than pre-consumer materials like production offcuts (unused virgin fabrics), we’re able to give the fibers a second life, while also tackling the issue of unutilized garment waste. The reclaimed garments are mechanically separated to free the fibers, which are then spun into yarns.

The recycling process results in shorter fibers, which often need to be combined with virgin fibers in order to maintain a high quality, soft product. Recycling pre-consumer materials results in longer fibers that need less virgin incorporation, however, using pre-consumer waste directly supports virgin cashmere production. 

Our decision to use post-consumer waste reduces the reliance on virgin resources, diverts waste from landfill and supports the transition to a circular economy. 

Our Global Recycled Standard (GRS) certified recycled cashmere is currently made from 70% post-consumer recycled cashmere, 25% virgin cashmere and 5% virgin wool. The virgin wool is certified with the Responsible Wool Standard (RWS) and the virgin cashmere is sourced from nomadic herders in Mongolia. The Responsible Wool Standard is a voluntary standard that ensures the welfare of sheep and the land they’re raised on.

Cashmere

Cashmere goats produce a double fleece that consists of a coarse outer coat, called guard hair, and a fine, soft undercoat, commonly referred to as cashmere. The fluffy undercoat keeps the animal warm over the winter and then sheds in spring. As the fine fibers loosen they are able to be removed by hand combing - a process that is neither distressing or disruptive to the animal if done correctly and responsibly.

Unlike sheep, goats destroy the grasses they eat, pulling them up by the roots rather than grazing the tops. For this reason cashmere production has been criticized for having a detrimental impact on the environment.The high demand for cashmere has caused increased herd sizes, and has resulted in the desertification of over 70% of healthy pasture land in Mongolia, which results in increased local temperature and air pollution.

Where we are at.

We want to eliminate the clothing industry’s dependence on unsustainable virgin animal fibers and combat global textile waste.

By using post-consumer materials like discarded garments (existing fabrics), rather than pre-consumer materials like production offcuts (unused virgin fabrics), we’re able to give the fibers a second life, while also tackling the issue of unutilized garment waste. The reclaimed garments are mechanically separated to free the fibers, which are then spun into yarns. 

The recycling process results in shorter fibers, which often need to be combined with virgin fibers in order to maintain a high quality, soft product. Recycling pre-consumer materials results in longer fibers that need less virgin incorporation, however, using pre-consumer waste directly supports virgin cashmere production. 

Our decision to use post-consumer waste reduces the reliance on virgin resources, diverts waste from landfill and supports the transition to a circular economy.

Our Global Recycled Standard (GRS) certified recycled cashmere is currently made from 70% post-consumer recycled cashmere, 25% virgin cashmere and 5% virgin wool. The virgin wool is certified with the Responsible Wool Standard (RWS) and the virgin cashmere is sourced from nomadic herders in Mongolia. The Responsible Wool Standard is a voluntary standard that ensures the welfare of sheep and the land they’re raised on.

Watch this space

This is just the start. We’re working on more material innovations, impact initiatives and expanding our product range. Check back for our latest updates.

Last Updated : 17.12.2020